Enrique Quevedo outboxes Chris Martin to secure win #15

Here we see Chris Martin of Chula Vista, CA on the receiving end of a right cross to his chin from the upset minded Enrique Quevedo from San Pedro, CA. Photo: Carlos Baeza/Thompson Boxing Promotions

Here we see Christopher Martin of Chula Vista, CA on the receiving end of a right cross to the chin from the upset minded Enrique Quevedo of San Pedro, CA. The super bantamweights were featured in the Main Event at the Doubletree Hotel, Ontario, Ca on Friday, October 18, 2013. Photo: Carlos Baeza/Thompson Boxing Promotions

Friday, October 18, 2013

It’s back to square one for San Diego’s Christopher Martin. On Friday night at the Doubletree Hotel in Ontario, CA, Martin (27-3-3, 9 KOs) lost by an unanimous decision to Enrique “Cuate” Quevedo (15-6-1, 9 KOs) of San Pedro, CA in the evening’s eight round Main Event presented by Thompson Boxing Promotions.


 

All three judges had Quevedo winning every round except one.

The noticeable difference in the camps? Quevedo was euphoric after hearing the decision. For him, beating a boxer of Martin’s stature was like winning a world title.

For Martin, this was a fall from grace as he will now drop in the world rankings. Box Rec was the first to react dropping Martin like a hot potato to #79. Being more realistic, if Las Vegas were to get involved and post a betting line on Martin’s next fight, we’d likely see him ranked around #29 or 30. That means at present there are 28 or 29 super bantamweights that would be favored to beat Martin. You can’t be unreliable when you’re going after a world title and that’s the rub on the mercurial Mr. Martin.

In their separate dressing rooms before the fight Enrique Quevedo (top, second from the right) and Chris Martin (bottom, center) posed for photos with their support staffs. All photos: Jim Wyatt

In separate dressing rooms before their fight, Enrique Quevedo (top, second from right) and Chris Martin (bottom, center) pose for photos with their support staffs. Photos: Jim Wyatt

On a four fight win streak since his unanimous decision loss to Luis Orlando Del Valle, Martin was never in this contest. Quevedo handedly outpointed Martin by applying steady pressure, landing consistent combinations and never letting up. 

At the conclusion of his bout with Chris Martin, one of Enrique Quevedo's corner people raised the hero high overhead to celebrate the grand victory.

Bt 1 c Chris Martin vs Quevedo

At the conclusion of his bout with Chris Martin, one of Enrique Quevedo's corner people raised the hero high overhead to celebrate the grand victory.

At the conclusion of his bout with Christopher Martin, one of Enrique Quevedo’s corner people raised his hero on high to celebrate the grand victory.

At the conclusion of their contest both Christopher Martin and the winner Enrique Quevedo pose for photos.

(top photo) At the conclusion of their bout both Christopher Martin (r) and the winner Enrique Quevedo (l) pose for photos. (below) Quevedo is joined by his entire entourage which includes his brother Daniel. Photos: Jim Wyatt

Overall, it was a very disappointing performance by Martin. When covering up, he resembled one of those fretful boxers on a comeback after a two to three year layoff. On occasion, he’d be himself and land a masterful combination. In both the seventh and eighth rounds he even went with the desperation, but off target, overhand right in an attempt to land the miracle KO punch. 

Quevedo’s best round turned out to be the fourth. In that round, a multitude of punches rained down on Martin. It must have felt like a hailstorm. Everything that Quevedo threw, landed. A standing eight count was certainly a strong possibility. Martin showed remarkable toughness as these punches kept landing. Near the end of this disastrous round, Martin confounded everyone by mounting a mini-comeback in which he landed his own unanswered blows.

Then we saw swelling under Martin’s right eye as they closed out the sixth. By this time, Martin had heard the harangues of everyone, his fans, friends, trainer, manager, even his promoter spoke out. They were all pleading, “You got to win these final two rounds!” The more objective fight fan knew better; only a knockout would secure the win.

Until that final bell, Quevedo kept up the pressure and often scored with these head snapping jabs and straight rights. Even after Martin landed a hard right to cause Quevedo’s nose to bleed, nothing would deter his opponent from matching or bettering Martin’s output.

All three judges scored the bout the same, 79-73 for Quevedo.

The Co-main event, featuring super bantamweights Juan Ramon “Pochito” Reyes (10-1-2, 1 KO) of Bell Gardens, CA and Daniel “The Baby Face Assassin” Roman (8-2-1, 3 KOs) Garden Grove, CA, was also a thriller. Most people were saying it was “the bout of the night.” Both of these gents went nonstop landing these hard shots to the head with many rounds too close to call. 

This boxing pundit had Roman taking rounds one, seven and eight. Reyes was in command throughout rounds two through six. He was also the busier and more accurate puncher. Once again, all three judges were in agreement and scored the bout 77-75 for Reyes to give him the slim but unerring, unanimous decision.

Prior to their bout, Juan Ramon Reyes (top, center) poses for a photo with friends and below we see Daniel Roman (center) with his coach and supporters.

Prior to his bout, Juan Ramon Reyes (top, center) poses for a photo with friends in his dressing room. (below) Daniel Roman (center) is with his coach and supporters.

(bottom, left) Juan Ramon Reyes (black trunks) gets punched in the face by his opponent Daniel Roman (blue trunks).

(bottom, left) Juan Ramon Reyes (black trunks) is about to get punched in the face by his worthy adversary Daniel Roman (blue trunks).

(bottom, right) At the conclusion of his all out war with Danny Roman, Juan Ramon Reyes has his arm raised in victory by referee Lou Moret.

(bottom, right) At the conclusion of his all out war with Danny Roman, Juan Ramon Reyes has his arm raised in victory by referee Lou Moret.

Both Daniel Roman (l)  and Juan Ramon Reyes (r) pose for photos with the show's sponsors after their great

Both Daniel Roman (l) and the victorious Juan Ramon Reyes (r) pose for photos with the show’s sponsors after their all out battle.

The undercard

The newest of the Thompson Boxing Promotions signees, bantamweight sensation Carlos “Memin” Carlson (12-0, 9 KOs) completely dominated fellow Tijuana boxer Guadalupe Barrera (5-2-3, 2 KOs).

In round #1, a hard left hook by Carlson forced Barrera to take a knee. In the second round Carlson sent Barrera to the canvas twice with the same left hook to the midsection. The end came at the 1:41 mark of round three after Carlson again trapped Barrera against the ropes and landed that killer hook to the body. After Barrera took yet another a knee, referee Wayne Hedgepeth called for an end to the carnage.

“I wanted to come out and put on a great show for the fans,” said Carlson in his interview after the fight. “With this being my first Thompson Boxing show, I wanted to impress everyone with my fan-friendly style.”

Prior to their match, Carlos Carlson (l) and Guadalupe Barrera (r) pose for a photo with their trainers.

Prior to their match, Carlos Carlson (left) and Guadalupe Barrera (right) posed for photos with their trainers.

This was "the up, then down", fight of the night. Carlos Carlson (white trunks) wasted no time in his demolition of Guadalupe Barrera. It was one knockdown after another.

This was “the up, then down”, fight of the night. Carlos Carlson wasted no time in his demolition of Guadalupe Barrera (black trunks). It was one knockdown after another.

Bt 3 c Carlson over Guadalupe Barrera

(top, left) The celebrated hero, Carlos Carlson, has his arm raised in victory by veteran referee Wayne Hedgepeth.

(top, left) The celebrated hero, Carlos Carlson, has his arm raised in victory by veteran referee Wayne Hedgepeth.

South San Diego’s Israel Arellano (7-1, 6 KOs) may have been bull rushed and smothered by Mario “Popeye” Hermosillo (12-11-3, 2 KOs) in the first two rounds but that tactic went out the window after Arellano gained the proper distance in Round #3. 

In that third round, Arellano’s power shots (wind ups) soon took their toll on Hermosillo (12-12-3, 2 KOs). Before long Arellano hurt Hermosillo with a straight right to the ribs and Hermosillo took a knee complaining to his corner about his recurring rib injury. Hermosillo was able to beat the count but referee Lou Moret opted to stop the bout to prevent further injury.

Prior to their match, Israel Arellano (top, with his support staff) and Mario Hermosillo (below) pose for a photo in their dressing rooms. Photos: Jim Wyatt

Prior to their match, Israel Arellano (top, with his support staff) and Mario Hermosillo (below) pose for a photo in their dressing rooms. Photos: Jim Wyatt

With Mario Hermosillo bull rushing his opponent, Israel Arellano (left) found himself in close quarters and fighting Hermosillo's t

In both rounds, one and two, Mario Hermosillo found success by bull rushing his taller opponent and fighting in close. Eventually, Israel Arellano (left) worked around this strategy and was soon unloading his big artillery on Hermosillo’s fragile midsection to earn the early stoppage. Photos: Jim Wyatt

(bottom, right) After his big win, Israel Arellano is joined by his support staff (l to r) Co-manager Lou Messina, brother Antonio Arellano, Israel Arellano, Saul Rios, Carlos Barragan Sr. and Carlos Barragan, jr.

Bt 4 d Israel Arellano has his arm raised in victory by referee Moret

(bottom, right) After his big win, Israel Arellano is joined by his support staff (l to r) Co-manager Lou Messina, brother Antonio Arellano, Israel Arellano, Saul Rios, Carlos Barragan Sr. and Carlos Barragan, Jr. Photos: Jim Wyatt

(bottom, right) After his big win, Israel Arellano is joined by his support staff (l to r) co-manager Lou Messina, brother Antonio Arellano, Israel Arellano, co-manager Saul Rios, and well known trainers Carlos Barragan Sr. and Carlos Barragan, Jr. Photos: J. Wyatt

In Bout #5, it was the roughhousing   Juan Carlos Sanchez (top) going up against the rather quiet and unassuming Joshua Conley, shown here with his support staff which includes well known trainer Henry Ramirez (second from the right, white hat).

In Bout #5, it was the roughhousing Juan Carlos Sanchez (top) going up against the rather quiet and unassuming Joshua Conley (below, center) surrounded by his support staff which includes well known trainer Henry Ramirez (second from the right, white hat).

Bt 5 b Joshua Conley vs Juan Carlos Sanchez

Trying to bait his opponent, Juan Carlos Sanchez goes through all sorts of wild and crazy gyrations.

Trying to throw his opponent, Joshua Conley, off his game, Juan Carlos Sanchez (black trunks) goes through all sorts of wild and crazy gyrations. Photos: Jim Wyatt

Bt 5 d Joshua Conley vs Juan Carlos Sanchez

 

Despite being busier, landing more punches and bringing the fight to San Bernardino, CA’s Joshua Conley (7-0-1, 6 KOs), the visiting Juan Carlos Sanchez (5-6-1, 4 KOs) from Saltillo, Mexico, was only able to walk away with a draw. Against the defensive-minded Conley, Sanchez used all sorts of angles to score his points. 

Meanwhile, Conley spent the majority of his time looking for the counter and then and only then would he attack. Conley did go for the knockout in the fifth round and took the initiative with harder blows that began to find their mark on the now retreating Sanchez. Conley was able to close strong landing left hooks and straight rights all the way to the final bell.

Judge Pat Connelly saw it 58-56 for Sanchez while Max Deluca scored it the same but for Conley. Marty Denkin saw it an even 57-57 split which made the bout a split decision draw.

Unable to reach a consensus, the three judges declared the bout between Juan Carlos Sanchez and Joshua Conley a draw.

Unable to reach a consensus, the three judges declared the bout between Juan Carlos Sanchez (l) and Joshua Conley (r) a draw. Photos: Jim Wyatt

In the show’s opening bout, local favorite Erick Ituarte (6-0-1, 1 KO) remained undefeated by defeating Roberto Ventura (3-5, 1 KO) of Tijuana by way of Guadalajara, Mexico in a four round super featherweight clash. 

Ventura had his moments especially when landing the big overhand rights but after Ituarte gained enough confidence to slip punches and counter, this was a done deal. In the third and fourth rounds, Ituarte increased the pressure by mixing in some hard body shots. All three judges had Ituarte winning every round.

With the win, Ituarte moves to 6-0-1, 1 KO, while Ventura drops to 3-5, 1 KO.

In their dressing room, prior to their bout, Roberto Ventura and Erick Ituarte posed for photos with their support staff.

In their separate dressing rooms, prior to their fight, Roberto Ventura (bottom) and Erick Ituarte (top, center) posed for photos with their support staff.

Bt 6b Erick Ituarte over Roberto Ventura

In the end it was Erick Ituarte having his arm raised by referee Lou Moret and he defeated Roberto Ventura.

In the end it was Erick Ituarte (top) having his arm raised in victory by referee Lou Moret after he defeated Roberto Ventura (blue trunks). Photos: Jim Wyatt

 

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About the Author

Jim Wyatt, a 1970 graduate of St. Joseph’s University in Philadelphia, has written weekly sports features for several Military newspapers, WCKMuayThai.com, SportofBoxing.com and Examiner.com as their San Diego Boxing Examiner. He was one of the four "Wise Guys" who predicted winning football selections versus the Vegas spreads. Some of the people he enjoyed meeting: Earvin "Magic" Johnson, WWF Wrestler Lita, LaDainian Tomlinson, Nate Kaeding and Darren Bennett of the Chargers, Tony Gwynn and Jake Peavy of the Padres, soccer stars Shannon MacMillan and Julie Foudy, Mixed Martial Artists Cris Cyborg, Junior Dos Santos, the Nogueira brothers plus the many great people involved in boxing and Muaythai.