Edivaldo Ortega continues to impress the boxing world

March 13, 2013 No Comments
Super Bantamweight Edivaldo "El Indio" Ortega (r) has his arm raised in victory by referee Juan Jose Ramirez after defeating Guadalupe Tapia, Wednesday evening at Salon Las Pulgas in downtown Tijuana. Below we have a photo of the champ's wife Mariana and son Iker Daichi who attended the latest show at Las Pulgas on Wednesday evening, March 13, 2013.

Super Bantamweight champ Edivaldo “El Indio” Ortega (top, right) has his arm raised in victory by referee Juan Jose Ramirez after defeating Guadalupe Tapia, Wednesday evening at Salon Las Pulgas. Below is the champ’s beautiful wife Mariana with son Iker Daichi.

This is no puff. Wednesday evening, on Memo Mayen’s 60th birthday, Promociones Mayen, hit another home run at the Salon Las Pulgas in Tijuana with a most exciting show spearheaded by the performance of undefeated super bantamweight Edivaldo “El Indio” Ortega along with three hard fought contests featuring fighters from San Diego.

In the 10 round Main Event, Ortega, the pride of Tijuana, wasted no time in establishing that he had the quicker hand speed while facing Jose Guadalupe “Lupillo” Tapia of Mexicali. With each exchange, Ortega came away with a three to one superiority. By round #3, the only thing Tapia established was the fact he could take a punch. 

Then came the shocker in Round four. After getting caught by two lunging straight rights, Ortega was surprised by a beauty of a left hook that sent him flying backwards to take a seat on the canvas. Ortega didn’t get to 15-0 without demonstrating resiliency. In an instant, he was up and ready to return the favor. Now Brimming with confidence, Tapia tried to capitalize on this new found advantage but he couldn’t. His wild and looping punches kept missing their mark.

From that wake-up call forward, Ortega went to work with a Manny Pacquiao-like vengeance. In the sixth round, just as Tapia darted forward, Ortega caught him with a short left hook which caused Tapia to drop to his knees. Sensing his opportunity to close out the fight, Ortega went full bore after Tapia and began to score with a barrage of punches. With Ortega’s relentless, unchecked combinations landing at will, the stoppage came at the 2:37 mark of the sixth round. While Ortega improves to (16-0-1, 8 KOs), Tapia falls to (7-7-0, 3 KOs).

Edivaldo Ortega over Guadalupe TapiaCollageThe first of three visitors from San Diego, Israel “Mr. KO” Arellano (5-0-0, 4 KOs) was involved in one of those “could have, should have, would have” fights. His opponent was Jose Ezequiel “Cheke” Avilez (5-1-1, 3 KOs) from Ensenada, B. C., Mexico. With both being big punchers, you knew this one would not go the distance and it didn’t. 

After Avilez took round one by the slimmest of margins, Arellano came back in Round #2 and appeared to be dominating with his superior boxing skills. But then Arellano became careless and got caught by either an overhand right or a left hook that sent him to the canvas. They’re still a discussion going on about which hand landed that KO blow. Perhaps Avilez can enlighten us. Anyway, like Ortega, Arellano was up in an instant. The only problem, his right leg was unsteady and gave way to a wobble. This was the indicator that gave referee Juan Jose Ramirez justification to call for an end to the bout.

It was debated later whether Arellano should have taken more time before getting up – taken it to an 8 or 9 count – then weathered the final nine seconds to give him an opportunity for a comeback in the two remaining rounds. As mentioned, both of these fighters are big time sluggers and it was merely a question of which would deliver that knockout blow first.

Bottom right photo shows Jose Ezequiel Avilez having his arm raised by referee Juan Jose Ramirez after he knocked Israel Arellano out in the second round of their four round super lightweight contest. All photos: Jim Wyatt

Top photos show the sequence of events after Israel Arellano fell backwards to the canvas. Bottom right photo shows Jose Ezequiel Avilez having his arm raised by referee Juan Jose Ramirez after knocking Israel Arellano out in the second round of their scheduled four round super lightweight bout on Wednesday evening, March 13, 2013. All photos: Jim Wyatt

Like Israel, his older brother, Antonio Arellano (6-0-1, 2 KOs) had a difficult time. His opponent 19 year-old Jesus “Bombardero” Valadez (6-1-0, 3 KOs) and his staff had devised a well thought out plan. It involved a lot of movement and circling away from the prodding Arellano’s power alley. Once Arellano caught up to him, Valadez would fire off a quick volley of punches, then move off again.

For those who scored the bout, Valadez took Round #1 by the slimmest of margins. Arellano came back and dominated in Round #2. Back came Valadez in Round #3, once again winning the round by the slimmest of margins. The fact Arellano’s nose had become red most likely swayed the judges. Round #4 was a toss-up.

The judges never wavered. All three had Valadez ahead three rounds to one for an unanimous decision victory.

In retrospect: It appeared Arellano was content to stay in the pocket and prod forward in his attempts to get inside Valadez’s defense. Whether it be his slower pace or whatever, he just couldn’t catch up with the elusive tap, tap and go, long, rangy and accurate counter puncher. The utter abandonment route of rushing Valadez to confine him in a corner or against the ropes was buried in the playbook.

In the bottom right panel we see Jesus Valadez having his arm raised in victory after defeating Antonio Arellano by an unanimous decision.

In the bottom right panel we see Jesus Valadez having his arm raised in victory after defeating Antonio Arellano by an unanimous decision.

Another clash that had everyone’s attention was the Sandra “Perla Negra” Robles (1-0) versus Diana “La Cazadora” Marquez bout. If I’m not mistaken, on Marquez’s trunks was written, “La Guerita” which means “The Blondie.” Since boxers often change their nickname on a weekly basis, we must take note of this revision.

In Round #1, it was welcome to pro boxing for Marquez who has competed in the Mixed Martial Arts. Robles came at her like a raging bull and literally chased her around the ring. Every time Marquez turned her head away, she got hit on the back of the neck. It was nothing like she had experienced in the gym. Robles even added a two punch combination after the bell.

The pummeling continued into Round #2, until Marquez showed her moxie and hit back, occasionally landing an hard right to the left side of Robles’ face. As a result, Robles soon had a welt or should I say mouse under her left eye. After doing the majority of her damage with the straight left and left hooks, Robles came away with an unanimous decision with scores of 40-35 from all three judges.

From the opening bell Sandra Robles was in complete command over Diana Marquez who was making her pro-debut.

From the opening bell Sandra Robles (shown here, center bottom) was in complete command over her opponent Diana Marquez who was making her pro-debut.

Also on the undercard was Robles’ younger brother, 16 year-old “Sexy Boy” Robles facing 17 year-old Marino Canete. Both were making their pro-debuts.

On the composure scale, Robles, who came out calm, cool and collected, gave the impression he had been boxing for years. He began to land these big, booming overhand rights. One had the taller Canete’s legs wobble.

To his credit Canete did well and never skipped a beat as he went back and forth from orthodox to southpaw. In the end, it was Robles having his arm raised after receiving scores of 40-36 twice and 39-37.

In another entertaining bout, it was "Sexy Boy" Robles (bottom photos) getting the decision victory over Marino Canete (top right).

In another entertaining bout, it was “Sexy Boy” Robles (bottom photos) getting the decision victory over Marino Canete (top right).

Another teenager, 16 year-old Carlos “Baby” Castañeda (4-1-0, 2 KOs) was matched up against the winless 24 year-old Carlos Alberto Avila (0-1-1).

Simply put, Avila must have wanted the win more than Castaneda. In the opening three rounds, he was sharper and busier. Then, between rounds, sitting there on his stool, Castañeda was told the bitter truth, “Hijo, you are behind, you need a knockout or at the very least a big round.”

Castañeda finally woke up and gave Avila a beating in that final round. Did it matter? After being down the three rounds, Castañeda needed a knockout which never came to be. It was Baby’s second loss of his young career. Avila’s first victory came by way a split decision with scores of 39-37 by judges Benjamin Rendon and Jose De La Mora while Carlos Flores had Castañeda ahead 40-36????

Carlos Avila over Carlos Castaneda

Carlos Avila (top photos) gets the win over Carlos Castaneda (bottom photos).

With Ivan Reyes (4-3-0, 4 KOs) defeating Rosalio “Aspid” Rios (5-0-0, 4 KOs) as an amateur, Reyes most likely figured their rematch in the professional ranks would be a piece of cake. Only one problem, since that time Rios has improved big time and Reyes’ career has fallen on hard times.

In Round #1, Rios went for broke and clobbered Reyes from every direction. In Round #2, he slowed his pace a bit but still landed more of the heavier blows. Reyes seemed unfazed and kept coming as if he were hoping Rios would tire by punching himself out. By the end of Round #3, there was this incredulous look on Rios’ face, ‘What’s it going to take to get this guy out of here?’

At the 1:49 mark of the final round, referee Cristian Curiel finally stepped in to stop the onslaught. If he hadn’t, the Arturo Gatti-like Reyes would have still been in there banging away.

Rosalio Rios over Ivan Reyes

Rosalio “Aspid” Rios (blue trunks) gets the TKO victory over Ivan “Titan” Reyes.

Jorge “Tito” Ruiz (1-0) from the Alliance Training Center in Chula Vista, CA was the third boxer making the trek south to challenge a Tijuana boxer. His opponent was the much shorter Gustavo “Canelito” Munoz who was making his pro-debut.

Ruiz’s defensive style, replicating Floyd Mayweather Jr.’s shoulder roll, never allowed Munoz to get close. With his shorter arms, Munoz’s punches always seemed to be an inch or two away from connecting. Munoz’s attempts to hit Ruiz could be likened to a youngster who is continually trying to reach up and swipe the bottom of a basketball net. He couldn’t do it.

Meanwhile, Munoz had to deal with Ruiz’s stiff, stinging jab. After the jab softened him up, Ruiz went with the impressive combinations.

Eventually the continual lambasting by right upper cuts and left hooks led to a knockdown in the final seconds of the bout. At the end of four, all three judges had it the same, 40-35 for Ruiz. The bout was never in doubt. Ruiz improves to 2-0 and Munoz drops to 0-1.

Jorge "Tito" Ruiz (center photo) who hails from the Alliance Training Center in Chula Vista, CA had a large group of supporters with him. Below we have his longtime coach, Sergio Melendrez and the rest of the remainder of the support group.

Jorge “Tito” Ruiz (center photo) who hails from the Alliance Training Center in Chula Vista, CA had a large group of supporters with him. Below we see his longtime coach, Sergio Melendrez along with the rest of the support group.

Also on the docket they had middleweights, Francisco “Vago” Flores (1-2-0) of Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico going up against Jose Manuel Hernandez of Tijuana (0-0-1)

Soon after Hernandez began to exploit his reach advantage, a cut appeared over Flores’ left eye. As the fight progressed, the cut got worse, a whole lot worse, until referee Cristian Curiel decided it was time to consult with the ringside physician Jose Luis Hernandez. At the fight doctor’s urging, Curiel decided to call for an end to the bout. Hernandez now goes to (1-o-1) while Flores drops to (1-3-0)

Top photo, we have Jose Hernandez having his arm raised by referee Cristian Curiel after getting the TKO victory  over Francisco Flores (bottom in black with yellow trim). All photos: Jim Wyatt

Top photo, we see Jose Hernandez having his arm raised by referee Cristian Curiel after getting the TKO victory over Francisco Flores (bottom in black trunks with yellow trim).

Next, they had super middleweight Antonio Gutierrez (8-0-1, 6 KOs) pounding Angel Estrada into submission. The difference in experience levels was evident from the start. For Estrada, being his first venture into the ring, he lasted all of 4 minutes and 10 seconds before his corner showed sound judgment and threw in the towel. Official time was 1:10 of the second round of a scheduled four rounder.

Jesus Antonio Gutierrez has his arm raised by referee Lee after defeating Angle Estrada

Jesus Antonio Gutierrez has his arm raised by referee Juan Morales Lee after defeating Angel de Jesus Estrada (R) who is shown sitting on his stool. Photo: Jim Wyatt

Flyweight Hector Flores took care of business by dominating Francisco Pedroza. From the outset, Flores was busier and landed the cleaner punches. At the 2:02 mark of the second round after dropping Pedroza once, referee Juan Morales Lee felt Pedroza had eaten enough leather and called for a halt to the match. 

Hector Flores over Francisco Pedroza

Hector Flores (top) gets the early stoppage victory over Francisco Pedroza (bottom).

Francisco Pedroza goes down to defeat vs Hecoter FloresCollageIn the final bout, it was Kevin “Lobo” Moreno (0-1) versus Jose Angel “Sonrics” Suarez making his pro-debut. In Round #1, Moreno caught Suarez flush and down he went. More embarrassed than hurt, Suarez spent the remainder of the round trying to do the same to Moreno.

From that point on, the two went toe to toe and many thought Suarez had done enough to overcome that early knockdown. When the scores were announced, judges Sergio Lechuga and Jesus Gonzalez Cesena had it 38-37 for Moreno and judge Leobardo Ibarra Bracamontes had it 38-38, a draw.

Kevin Moreno over Jose Angel Suarez

Kevin Moreno (white trunks with black trim) gets the mixed decision victory over Jose Angel Suarez (blue trunks, red trim). All photos: Jim Wyatt

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